Toyota Supra Review & Ratings

Toyota Supra Overview

The Toyota Supra is classified as a sports car or grand tourer and is manufactured by the Toyota Motor Corporation. Production of this vehicle began in 1978 and ended in 2002. The overall styling of this vehicle is based on the Toyota Celica, though it does have a wider and longer body. The Supra became a separate model from the Celica in 1986 when it was in its third generation. As a result, Toyota stopped using the “Celica” name and began branding the vehicle as simply the ‘Supra”. All of the first, second, and third generations of this vehicle were assembled at the Tahara plant in Tahara, Aichi.

The Supra underwent many changes starting in 1985, including the engine which received a power increase to 161 horsepower and 169 pound-feet of torque. All of the Supra models this year were capable of the same amount of work, both the automatic models and 5-speeds. A throttle position sensor was added to the engines in these Supras along with a new EGR system and knock sensor. The increase of power allowed this vehicle to accelerate from 0-60 mph in just 8.4 seconds. There were some other small changes made to this vehicle, including a more integrated sunshade as well as a spoiler on the rear hatch.

The very first Supra Turbo was introduced onto the market in 1987. There was an inter-cooled version of the 3.0 liter inline 6-cylinder engine which boasted a total power output of 230 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque. This turbo model came with an engine oil cooler as well as an integrated rear spoiler. The Sports Package for this vehicle, which was standard on the Turbo but optional on the base model, came with a limited slip differential as well as headlamp washers and TEMS.

There were some modifications that were made to the 1989 version Supra, including changes to the wastegate actuator which resulted in a power increase of 2 horsepower on the turbo model. There were also changes to the engine mount and brace near the end of 1989. The changes that were made to the cross member and mounts were done so to create enough room for the 1JZ engine in the Japanese models. All of these models received rear 3-point seat belts to replace the 2-point lap belts of the previous model. This vehicle was considered to be much safer and a bit more powerful than its predecessor, making it a more attractive overall buy for consumers at the time.

The 1990 model Supra also brought quite a few changes, including larger protective laminate in front of its rear wheels as well as a lower redline and a redesigned steering wheel with cruise control. There was also an airbag and an airbag indicator light added to the dash and a redesigned left side switch panel. The lower dash panel was broken down into two pieces for this vehicle, making it significantly heavier than the one-piece panel because of a change in the material used.

There were two different non-export models of the Supra available in Japan, including the J7A70, which uses a 2.5 liter 280 PS twin-turbo 1JZ-GTE engine, and the GA70 which uses a 2.0 liter 210 PS twin-turbo 1G-GTE and non-turbo 1G-GEU engine. The Mark IV was launched in 1993 and was considered a fairly big leap for the Japanese automaker, as it was a new and more serious high-performance car. The subframe, drivetrain assemblies, and suspension all came from the Z30 Soarer, and the test model pre-production of this vehicle began in December of 1992 with 20 different models.

Toyota Supra Gallery

Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra
Toyota Supra

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