Nissan Almera Review & Ratings

Nissan Almera Overview

The Nissan Almera is classified as a small family car and is produced by the Japanese carmaker Nissan. Production of this vehicle started in 1995 and ended in 2006. The Almera was the European export-market equivalent of the modern Nissan Pulsar as well as the second generation Nissan Bluebird Sylphy. This vehicle’s name has been used for a number of other versions of this car in the past, including the South Korean-manufactured Samsung SM3, the Nissan Latio, and the Nissan Bluebird Sylphy. The “Almeras” name refers to a family name of French racing drivers during the 1980s.

The first generation of the Nissan Almera started production in 1995 as a replacement for the Nissan Sunny. This nameplate had been used for almost thirty years and this vehicle was nearly identical to the N15 Nissan Pulsar, which was sold in Japan. There were, however, some trim option differences as well as the petrol engines that were offered. This vehicle uses a 1.4 GA14DE and 1.6 GA16DE petrol engine as well as 2.0 CD20 diesel engines for the 1995 models, though a 2.0 SR20DE-engined GTi was introduced to the range a year into production. A vast majority of Almeras sold in the UK came in hatchback form with three or five doors.

The Almera received a fairly significant facelift in 1998, with redesigned front bumpers as well as front splitters which were added to the Si/Sri models. The GTi model had a standard all-round bodykit, though there was an option that did not include it. The original telescopic radio aerial in this vehicle was moved from the drivers A-pillar to the rear of the room with a “bee-sting” type design. The phase 2 headlight as well as the front indicators came with a black surround on the GTi model as well. There were some subtle changes made to the bodykit of this vehicle, including straight design on the GTi with new vents on the rear splitter.

The second generation Nissan Almera was initially launched in January of 2000 and it differed from its predecessor with a new smoother and curvier design, though there were quite a few people who criticized this vehicle for being too bland compared to some of its competitors. The N16 Almera was based on Nissan’s internationally-used MS-platform, which was this automaker’s first new platform to be developed after partnering up with Renault. The MS Platform was also used for the new Primera and Almera Tino.

The Almera hatchback is extremely similar to the Pulsar hatchback, which is sold in both Australia and New Zealand. The Almera four-door sedan is based on the Bluebird Sylphy, though its front end has a different design. The N16 Almera offered quite a few improvements over its predecessor, especially with regards to handling, drive dynamics, and tire grip. This vehicle also felt like more of a stable off-road vehicle and was also well-suited as a family car, making it highly versatile and attractive to consumers.

Even though the first generation Almera was considered to be very spacious, the N16 didn’t offer much in the way of rear passenger legroom because it was slightly shorter than the category average 2.53 meters wheelbase. This vehicle is still considered to be fairly spacious though, offering plenty of room for both driver and passengers. The second generation of this vehicle was made available in three different body styles, including the three or five-door hatchback and a 4-door saloon with 1.5 and 1.8 Nissan QG engine series petrol engines. There were also 2.2 direct injection turbodiesel engines which were rated for 110 bhp and offered plenty of power for a car in this class.

Nissan Almera Gallery

Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera
Nissan Almera

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