Honda Prelude Review & Ratings

Honda Prelude Overview

The Honda Prelude is classified as a sports coupe and is produced by the Japanese carmaker Honda. Production of this vehicle started in 1978 and ended in 2001. The 2-door coupe version of this vehicle was loosely based on the Honda Accord, spanning a total of five generations. The Prelude was the first vehicle to introduce the Honda Verno sales chain to the public and was introduced on an international level. Some of this vehicle’s competitors include the Toyota Celica as well as the Nissan Silvia and the Mitsubishi Escape. This vehicle was just the first one in a series of others from Honda that all have musically inspired names, such as the Concerto, Ballade, and Quintet.

The very first Prelude was launched in November of 1978 and was only made available in Japan at the Honda Verno dealership sales channel. This dealership chain introduced the Honda Quint, which was the entry level model, as well as the Honda Ballade and the Honda Vigor, the series’ largest sedan and hatchback. There were a number of components in this vehicle which were borrowed from the Honda Accord, including the brakes, engine, and independent struts. The chassis, however, was brand new and developed by Hiroshi Kizawa, chief engineer for Honda at the time.

The second generation of the Prelude was launched in Japan in November of 1982 and in other international markets the following year. This vehicle used a whole new platform which was available an A18A or ET-2 1.8 liter 12-valve twin carburetor engine that is capable of producing up to 110 horsepower, complete with fuel injection in all of the Si models in 1985. This vehicle was available with a 2 liter DOHC 16-valve PGM-FI engine in Asia, Japan, and Europe, though it was not launched in the European market until 1986.

The third generation of the Prelude was launched in April of 1987 and was released in the Japanese domestic market and other international markets later that same year. This vehicle was marketed as the 1988 model throughout North America and featured evolutionary styling from its predecessor as well as the same basic design aspects as the Honda NSX which was introduced in 1989. This vehicle was built with a number of innovative features and a drag coefficient of 0.34 as well as roof pillars that are made of high-strength metal. The third generation Prelude was powered by different versions of the Honda B20A engine as well as a base carburetor version with a SOHC 12-valve valvetrain.

The fourth generation of the Prelude was introduced in September of 1991 and was introduced to the Japanese market and the rest of the world as the 1992 model. This vehicle has 58% front and 42% rear weight distribution and the traditional 4-wheel steering system was changed to an electronic version. The engine in the new Prelude was also changed with an increased capacity of 2.2 liters for the base “S” model; this engine is a SOHC F22A1, capable of 123 horsepower at 5200 rpm.

The fifth generation Prelude came onto the market in November of 1996, retaining an FF layout as well as independent front suspension and 63/37 weight distribution. A majority of these Prelude models were equipped with 16” aluminum alloy wheels as well as all-season 205/50 R16 87V tires. Both the 2.0i and JDM Si trims came with 195/60 R15 88H and the JDM XI was equipped with 14” steel wheels. This generation Prelude introduced a return to the square body style that the third generation models used as a way to increase sales which had started to drop off.

Honda Prelude Gallery

Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude
Honda Prelude

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