Honda NSX Review & Ratings

Honda NSX Overview

The Honda NSX is a sports car that is sold as the Acura NSX in North America as well Hong Kong and was first produced in 1990 till 2005 by Japanese carmaker Honda. This vehicle comes with a mid-engine rear-wheel drive layout and uses an all-aluminum V6 gasoline or petrol engine which features Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control system or VTEC. The second generation of this vehicle was first introduced in 2012 and came with an all-wheel drive V6 hybrid powertrain and production is currently set for 2015.

In 1984, Honda commissioned Pininfarina to design the HP-X or Honda Pininfarina Xperimental, which used a mid-mounted C20A 2.0 liter V6 configuration. This vehicle marked the first production car ever to feature an all-aluminum monocoque body as well as an extruded aluminum alloy frame and suspension. By using aluminum for the body of this vehicle, the weight was reduced by over 200 kg, and a suspension compliance pivot helped to maintain wheel alignment changes at a value of close to zero. Some of the other noteworthy features of this vehicle include an independent 4-channel anti-lock brake system as well as titanium connecting rids inside the engine to promote reliable high-rpm ooperation.

When the NSX was released in 1990, the concept version measured a total of 1,170 mm in height, which a total of 141.3 mm taller than the Ford GT 40. This vehicle was the first one of its kind to showcase the kind of technology that Honda was capable of. The NSX’s strong chassis rigidity as well as its cornering and handling abilities were a direct result of the input from Ayrton Senna, who was one of the chief engineers involved with this project. The Honda NSX won the Car of the Year award in 1991 from Wheels magazine in Australia as well as Automobile of the Year in Automobile Magazine in the same year.

The NSX-R (JDM) was a modified version of the NSX that was designed for better on-track performance at the expense of certain creature comforts. Honda engineers began with a base NSX coupe and started to develop ideas for weight reduction to provide this vehicle with more speed. The final drive ratio of this vehicle is 4.235:1 and used a ring and pinion steering design instead of the 4:06:1 unit. This is by far the lightest of all the NSX variants and a number of other models were produced for the Japanese domestic market in 1992.

There was a second iteration of the NSX-R, named the “Refresh”, which was launched in 2002, though exclusively for the Japanese market. Just like with the NSX-R, developers and engineers focused on weight reduction. The chassis on this vehicle is based on the fixed-roof coupe because of its lighter weight and more rigid build. The vented hood which this car was also designed with was supposedly the biggest one-piece carbon-fiber hood for any production car in the world.

The 3.2 liter DOHC V6 engine that the Refresh uses received a lot of attention from the public and it was hand assembled by a technician who employed methods that are typically reserved for racing vehicles. All of the components that make up the rotating assembly, such as the pistons, crank, and rods, were all precision weighted and matched to ensure that they all fell within a a small tolerance of weight level. When this vehicle was launched, it quickly became clear that it could challenge any racing car on the track. With more power and precision than anyone ever expected, the NSX-R is certainly a unique vehicle by any standards.

Honda NSX Gallery

Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX
Honda NSX

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