Bugatti Veyron Review & Ratings

Bugatti Veyron Overview

The Bugatti Veyron is classified as a mid-engined supercar and is designed and developed by the Volkswagen Group with manufacturing taking place in Molsheim, France. The first version of this vehicle had a top speed of 407.12 km/h or 252.97 mph and received the title of “Car of the Decade” from 2000-2009 from the BBC television program Top Gear. The standard version of this vehicle won the award of Best Car Driven All Year from Top Gear Magazine in 2005 as well. The Veyron has a sleek design and powerful specs that have made it one of the more popular models from this automaker.

The current version of the Veyron, a Super Sport model, made its way into the pages of the Guinness World Records book as the fastest street-legal production car on the planet with a top speed of 431.072 km/h or 267.856 mph, as the well as the Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse version which has a top speed of 408.84 km/h or 254.04 mph. Harmut Warkuss was the chief designer for the Veyron and the exterior was designed by Jozef Kaban, who worked for Volkswagen at the time. There have been a few different variants of the Veyron produced, and each of them comes with a unique overall design and individual features.

This car’s origin starts in 1998 when the Volkswagen Group bought the trademark rights from Bugatti, the former manufacturer of the vehicle, in an effort to revitalize the brand. There were a number of different 18-cylinder concept cars that were shown in international auto shows around the world, starting with the EB118. The Veyron was first displayed at the Tokyo Motor Show in 1999 and at the time was called the Bugatti Veyron EB 18.4 and came with a 3-bank W18 engine as opposed to the 2-bank W16 engine that was used for the production version. Although these prototypes had all been styled by Giugiaro, this one was designed by stylists at Volkswagen.

The origin of the Veyron’s name comes from Pierre Veyron, who was a development engineer at Bugatti as well as a test driver and company race driver. Veyron won the 1939 24 hours of Le Mans while driving a vehicle bearing the Bugatti name. The “EB” in the car’s name is a reference to Ettore Bugatti, founder of the company. A new model of the Veyron was released in 2005 and featured an 8.0 liter quad-turbocharged W16 cylinder engine for increased power.

The transmission that the 2005 Veyron uses is a dual-clutch direct-shift gearbox computer-controlled automatic with seven gear ratios as well as magnesium paddles which are located behind the steering wheel and a shift time of less than 150 milliseconds. This transmission was built by Ricardo of England, as opposed to Borg-Warner, who was responsible for designing the 6-speed DSG which was used in the mainstream Volkswagen Group Marques. This model Veyron can be driven in semi-automatic or full-automatic mode and a replacement for its transmission costs a total of $120,000.

The Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport was introduced in 2009 with just 150 units produced, and 50 of them were given to registered Bugatti customers only. This vehicle is the targa top version of the Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 and has numerous reinforcements to make up for the fact that it does not have a traditional roof, as well as small minor changes to the windshield and running lights. There are two different removable tops on this vehicle, including a temporary one that was fashioned after an umbrella. The Veyron is without a doubt one of the fastest, sleekest, and most attractive sports cars in all the world, even today.

Bugatti Veyron Gallery

Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron
Bugatti Veyron

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