Audi TT Review & Ratings

Audi TT Overview

The Audi TT first came about as a concept car in 1995 but did not actually go into production until five years later. This vehicle was highly anticipated by many and had a very organic design as well as a style that was unlike anything Audi had come out with in the past. The slab-sided flanks as well as other more subtle exterior features definitely made this vehicle unique in its own right. The TT was named after the Tourist Trophy race which is traditionally held on the Isle of Man. What is interesting about this vehicle is that it isn’t quite a sports car and at the same time not a sport coupe or roadster either, but rather something all its own.

For the first two generations of the Audi TT, it was available as a 2+2 Coupe as well as a two-seater roadster, reflecting many of the classic characteristics and hallmarks of Volkswagen’s Group A platform, which is something that started with the A4. Because of the fact that this vehicle shares its platform with other vehicles, it has the exact same powertrain and suspension layout as many of them.

The TT Mk1 was first manufactured in 1998 and just after that the Roaster was produced. This vehicle is also based on the A4 platform which was also used for Volkswagen’s Golf Mk4 along with the very first Audi A3. The final style of the TT Mk1 was just a bit different than the original concept, which is something that surprised some consumers and there were mixed reactions. The only really significant difference from the concept in terms of overall style was the bumpers which were reprofiled only slightly. Some of the earlier TT models appeared in the news quite a bit after numerous high-speed accidents involving them in different parts of Europe. All of these crashes as well as the fatalities that resulted from the accidents occurred at speeds of over 110 mph.

When it comes to the mechanics of the Audi TT, it shares a powertrain layout with the Volkswagen Group platform vehicles. This vehicle uses a transversely mounted internal combustion engine. Consumers have the option of buying this vehicle with front-wheel drive or Quattro on-demand four-wheel drive. When this vehicle was first made available to the public, it had a 1.8 liter inline 4-cylinder 20-valve turbocharged engine with 180 PS and 178 horsepower.

The TT Quattro Sport was released in 2005 as a limited edition only in the UK where only 800 were ever sold, as opposed to the 1,000 that Audi had planned. This vehicle, also known as the Audi TT Club Sport in Europe, was built Quattro GmbH, a high-performance specialist subsidiary of AUDI. With this new model TT also came a more powerful 240 PS, 237 horsepower engine which was capable of 236 pound-feet of torque. This vehicle also has a lighter design than the other TT models, allowing it to speed up from 0 to 100 km in just 5.9 seconds.

As far as the interior of the current Audi TT is concerned, it is definitely crafted expertly with high-quality materials all throughout. This vehicle comes with a few standard features which include xenon headlights, leather upholstery, a 12-speaker Bose audio system with satellite radio, and Bluetooth connectivity. There are certain features which consumers can get if they are willing to upgrade and pay a little bit more money, including 19” wheels, sport suspension, heated seats, a navigation system, and a number of other things. This vehicle from Audi is certainly a masterpiece and remains as one of their top sellers.

Audi TT Gallery

Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT
Audi TT

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